The Right Ingredients

I have been baking cookies for Christmas so my thoughts are on the chemistry of taking seemingly disparate items and combining them to make something else entirely.  Years ago my sister decided to make chocolate chip cookies for the first time.  She got out the family recipe which creates a stiff dough by having more dry ingredients than moist.  She was careful to measure the ingredients exactly as the recipe required but ended up with a mess in the bowl that wouldn’t coalesce into dough.

 

When I got home that day she asked me what had happened.  In talking to her I realized that she had put all of the ingredients into the bowl at once.  Instead of cookies, she had clean up duty.

 

The ingredients can be there, all in the right proportions, but sometimes the key is how to combine them.  This particular recipe works best if you start out by segregating the moist and dry ingredients, creating a batter with the moist and then slowly adding in the dry ingredients, beating the batter to help it absorb the flour mixture bit by bit.

 

So what does a baking lesson have to do with business, right?  Everything.  Exchange flour, sugar and eggs for whatever pieces make up your business.  Maybe you had an idea that wasn’t received well.  Did you decide that you wouldn’t try it again?  It might not have been your idea at all – there could have been any number of other things that could have affected the outcome.  You have to consider all of the components.

 

Revisit your idea with your boss – or whoever you talked to about the idea, after you’ve given the original situation some thought.  Use an open approach, asking questions. If you make it clear that you want to participate more in growth, then it should be well received.

 

I hope you end up with some beautiful, delicious cookies.

 

© 2012 Practical Business | Reasonable Expectations

 

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2 Comments

Filed under Personal Growth, Work Life

2 responses to “The Right Ingredients

  1. Pingback: Relevance, Your Way | Practical Business

  2. Pingback: Be an Emulsifying Agent | Practical Business

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