Defining Done

Has it ever happened to you that you happily turned in a completed project only to have the other party sort through it and respond with, ‘oh, but’?  The one or two of you out there who said no don’t have to keep reading, unless you want to that is.

 

If you verified the exact expectations of the completed project before starting, then good for you and shame on the other party for changing their mind after you thought your work was done.  The current word for the expectations, or results that should come out of a project is deliverables, buzz word if you like.  It is actually descriptive and clear enough that I agree with its usage in this context.

 

If you did not get clarity on expectations from the other party and proceeded with the project based on assumptions, well – live and learn.  And then adopt project management best practices, without having to pursue a PMP (Project Management Professional certification from Project Management Institute).  Defining the exact meaning of done, in agreement with the stakeholder is part of the PM’s early activities.

How do you know when a chain is complete?

How do you know when a chain is complete?

 

Think how much easier your life around the office would be if you picked up and used this little nugget.  Back a few years ago, after I had started to think about studying up on being a Project Manager, but before I had started to actually do so, I had a meeting with my team where we white boarded our definition of a project and here is some of what we decided:

 

We put the definition of a Project up on the white board as follows –

  • Anything outside your normal routine
  • Requires a deadline
  • Requires focus or analysis
  • May require outside sources to complete (internal NSC, member, customer, etc)
  • Can be initiated by various constituents such as: customer, sales, or internal staff
  • May require measurement
  • Often requires specialized communication (can set up templates for frequently used requests like price audits)
  • Should develop a process for repetition and sharing best practice
  • May need to be tracked

 

Preparing to complete a project request –

  • Are all necessary questions answered by the requester – who, what, where, when & why?
  • Have reasonable expectations been set?
  • Do you understand the final outcome that is expected?

 

ALWAYS document the date received and determine completion date based on complexity and other activities on your desk + customer/requester needs.  If you cannot complete in the time requested, you should come to me ASAP to discuss solutions.

 

When responding to requester to set parameters use the phrase, “In order to provide complete and accurate information, (and then set a reasonable deadline).  You then MUST meet this deadline.

 

The PMI definition component that we missed above is that a project is temporary, but we sort of covered that in the first bullet point.  And that is defining done.

 

© 2013 Practical Business | Reasonable Expectations

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